Caterpillars, a Butterfly, a Dove and some Toadstools

I was going to put these in that last post, but had to resize and drop the resolution on them first. So you get 2 posts in One day 🙂

First, we have at least one juvenile Brown Tree snake hanging about. These snakes are pretty cute.

BTS

I found a couple of Caterpillars on the Lime tree last week and took some photos. I found out that they are the Caterpillars of the Orchid Swallowtail Butterfly. A few days ago at least one of the pair made its cocoon and is metamorphosing.

Two Orchid Swallowtail caterpillars Papilio aegeus on the Lime tree.

Two Orchid Swallowtail caterpillars Papilio aegeus on the Lime tree.

The caterpillars are quite shy and will tuck their heads under their body. If the branch is disturbed, they extend Red tentacles from above the head.

_MG_2863

_MG_2860

These 'horns' are a defence mechanism of the caterpillar.

These ‘horns’ are a defence mechanism of the caterpillar.

One of the caterpillars became more active late last week. I suspected it was readying to build a cocoon.

Caterpillar exploring the leaf

Caterpillar exploring the leaf

I was right I guess. I can only find One cocoon. Check out the support strand that holds it up under the branch

This is the chrysalis or cocoon of the caterpillar

This is the chrysalis or cocoon of the caterpillar

This is what will emerge from the cocoon when it has finished its transformation

This is the Papilio aegeus butterfly. The Orchid Swallowtail

This is the Papilio aegeus butterfly. The Orchid Swallowtail

The Doves are getting less wary of the dogs now.

A Bar Shouldered Dove

A Bar Shouldered Dove

The Rosella bushes are budding now too.

The Rosellas are budding

The Rosellas are budding

With all this rain, the mulch I created when mowing the yard has helped a mass of mushroom/toadstools to grow. Here are a few images I liked of them.

mushrooms 01‘;mushrooms 02

mushrooms 05

mushrooms 04

mushrooms 03

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5 thoughts on “Caterpillars, a Butterfly, a Dove and some Toadstools

  1. Despite your excellent photos, I can’t identify what species that fungi is with any great degree of confidence.
    Do you think it could be Collybia dryophila?
    Otherwise I was thinking Mycena marangania, but I think the cap is a bit convex and I’m not sure if the gill attachment matches yours.

    On a difference topic – do you make rosella jam?
    : )

    Liked by 1 person

    • I’m a bit of a fungi neophyte Dayna. However, you have piqued my geeky curiosity and I will now have to start searching the Interwebz. I may end up buying a real book even 🙂 . I bought Wrigley & Fagg’s Native Plants book, and a really good Reptile reference last year. I’m slowly rebuilding my tactile reference library.
      Books of note so far:
      Slater’s Field Guide to Australian Birds (2nd Ed.) ISBN 9781877069635
      Australian Native Plants – Cultivation, use in landscaping and propagation (6th Ed.) ISBN 9781921517150
      Reptiles & Amphibians of Australia Harold G Cogger (7th Ed.) ISBN 9780643100350
      Do you have any reference books you refer to when it comes to fungi? The Internet is good, but I like a good heavy book to leaf through too.
      Rosella Jam? Do I make Rosella Jam she asks? Probably the best Rosella jam this side of the Daintree according to some fans 🙂 . I am planning on making a Rosella wine or spirit this season as well as some more yummy Jam.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Wine or spirit, hey? Mmmmm.
        I only came across fresh rosellas once in Brisbane – actually, it was at s fruit barn at Gatton, in the Lockyer Valley about an hour west. We didn’t really know what we were doing, but it didn’t work out too badly.
        As for fungi, I’ve recently purchased Bruce Fuhrer’s “A field guide to Australian fungi”. I’m still learning how it works, but practice makes…better.
        My bird bible is my Simpson & Day field guide. I’ve got a key guide for reptiles and amphibians, a field guide for mammals and probably what I’d call an encyclopedia of Australian mammals – a big, thick, hard-back text book from Uni days that’s pretty awesome. I’ve got two copies of Triggs’ Scats, Tracks & Other Traces but I can only ever find one copy at any given time.
        As for plants, I think I’ve got Tassie covered (apart for orchid, ferns & bryophytes) and the Grampians (western Vic) and our alpine regions, but I dunno… There are so many books on plants, some better than others and none really complete.

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      • I’ve always been a fan of Wrigley and Fagg. They have a very comprehensive list of Australian natives. I loved Nan & Hugh Nicholson’s ‘Rainforest’ series too. I will check out the fungi book, and will hunt down a copy of Scats, Tracks & Other Traces too.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Thanks, I’ll have a look.
        Any bookshop worth it visiting should have a copy of Barbara Triggs’ book.
        I was also pretty stoked recently to find Gordon Beruldsen’s “Australian Birds their Nests and Eggs” (ISBN 0-646-42798-9). I’ve been keeping half an eye out for an Australian guide to birds nests/eggs for years. Naturally I found it in Tassie. There are some great book shops in both Hobart and Launceston.

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